Inferencing
Practice Lesson

Step 1

Introducing the Concept 

Student Workbook Page 126

Say,Do you remember what making inferences means?” Wait for student response. “Making inferences is an idea that is suggested by facts or details but not explicitly said.” 

 

Part 1 

Point to the first picture. Say, I want you to look at this picture. Where is the person in the picture?Wait for student response. “I agree with you, I think the person is at the beach, but how did you know that? I didn’t tell you. There aren’t any words on the picture to tell you that. How did you do that?” Wait for student response. “Wow! You are making inferences! You used clues from the photo and from your prior knowledge to figure out that this person is at the beach.”

“With your pen, write your inference on the line next to the #1. Start the sentence with, I infer…” Wait for student to write inference.

 

Part 2 

Point to the second picture. Say, “I want you to look at this picture. Where is the person in this picture? Wait for student response. “I agree with you, I think the person is at the library, but how did you know that? I didn’t tell you. There aren’t any words on the picture to tell you that. How did you know that?” Wait for student response. “Wow you are making inferences! You used clues from the photo and from your prior knowledge to figure out that the person is at the library.”  

With your pen, write your inference on the line next to the #2. Start the sentence with, I infer… Wait for student to write inference. 

 

Part 3 

Point to the third picture. Say, I want you to look at this picture. Where is the person in this picture? Wait for student response. “I agree with you, I think the person is at the zoo, but how did you know that? I didn’t tell you. There aren’t any words on the picture to tell you that. How did you know that?” Wait for student response. “Wow you are making inferences! You used clues from the photo and from your prior knowledge to figure out this person is at the zoo.” 

“With your pen, write your inference on the line next to the #3. Start the sentence with, I infer… Wait for student to write inference.  

Step 2

Visual Association

Student Workbook Page 127

Hold up the WHO Card. Point to the picture. Say, “Who is in this picture?” Wait for student response. Point to the who word under the picture. “With your pen fill in the information next to the who prompt.” Wait for student to write a sentence.

 

Hold up the WHAT Card. Point to the picture. Say, “What are the people in this picture doing?” Wait for student response. Point to the what word under the picture. Say, “With your pen fill in the information next to the what prompt.” Wait for student to write a sentence.

 

Hold up the WHERE Card. Point to the picture. Say, “Where do you think the people in this picture are?” Wait for student response. Point to the where word under the picture. With your pen fill in the information next to the where prompt.” Wait for student to write a sentence.

 

Hold up the WHEN Card. Point to the picture. Say, “When do you think that this picture happened?” Wait for student response. Point to the when word under the picture. “With your pen fill in the information next to the when prompt.” Wait for student to write a sentence.

 

Hold up the WHY Card. Point to the picture. Say, “Why do you think people like to watch sports games?” Wait for student response. Point to the why word under the picture. “With your pen fill in the information next to the why prompt.” Wait for student to write a sentence.

 

Say, “What title would you give this picture? Why?” Wait for response. 

“Write the title at the top of the page.” Wait of student to write title.

What do you think happened before this picture?” Wait for response

“What is happening during the picture?” Wait for response. 

“What do you predict is going to happen right after this picture?” Wait for response. 

“Why do you predict that?” Wait for response.

“What sounds do you hear in your mind when you look at this picture?” Wait for response.

“What smells do you smell in your mind when you look at this picture?” Wait for response.

“How do the people sitting in the stands, watching the game feel?” Wait for response.

Step 3

Connecting the Concept

Say, “I want you to take a minute and think about something you are super interested or fascinated about. Then I am going to ask you some questions.”

What are you really interested in?” Wait for student response.

Where do you pursue this interest?” Wait for student response.

When do you pursue this interest?” Wait for student response.

Why do you pursue this interest?” Wait for student response.

How do you pursue this interest? Wait for student response.

Give the student the Questions Cards to hold. 

Say, “Now I want you to ask me questions about my interests. Hold up each question card one at a time and ask me a question related to my interests. Wait for student to ask questions.  

Step 4

Story Organizer

Student Workbook Page 128

 

PART 1 

Say, “Listen carefully as I describe something. You are going to use the clues to infer what is being described.”

Say, “I am round. I am made by the government. A president’s face is on me. I am made of copper. What am I?” (a penny) 

Point to the graphic organizer.

“Next to the #1, I want you to write down your inference and your clues.” Wait for student to write inference. 

 

PART 2

Say, “Listen carefully as I describe something. You are going to use the clues to infer what is being described.” Wait for student response. 

“You see me when you smile. There are two sets of me. I can wear braces. You use me to chew food. Kids have 20 and adults have 32 of me. What am I?” (teeth)

Point to the graphic organizer.  

“Next to the #2, I want you to write down your inference and your clues. Wait for student to write inference.  

PART 3 

Say, “Listen carefully as I describe something. You are going to use the clues to infer what is being described.” Wait for student response. 

“I am known for my big size. My nickname is the Lone Star State. I was once my own country. I have many miles of beaches. My capital is Austin. What am I?” (Texas)

Point to the graphic organizer.

“Next to the #3, I want you to write down your inference and your clues.” Wait for student to write inference.

“Now it’s your turn! Describe something without telling me what it is, and I have to guess what it is.” Wait for student to tell you an inference riddle.

Step 5

Writing

Student Workbook Page 129

Say, “You are going to write a story about somewhere that is very scary without saying that this place is scary. Use lots of clues so that the reader can infer that this is a scary place.”  

Wait for the student to write the story. When complete, have the student read the story aloud. Teachers, please use your discretion if editing. The point of this exercise is to practice the concept and get the ideas down on paper.

Step 6

Reading a Story

Student Workbook Page 132-135 : Outer Space

Point to the title of the story. Say, What is the title of this story?” Wait for student response.

Say, “What do you predict that this story might be about? Why do you predict this? What do you already know about Outer Space?” Wait for student response.

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 1

Say, “Read the first paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look at you. 

“Who is the main character in this story?” (Kyle)

“What is Kyle very interested in? How do you know that?” (outer space)

“What kind of rules do Kyle’s parents enforce?” (going to bed at the same time)

“How does Kyle feel about this rule? Why?” (frustrated)

“Why is it important for Kyle to stay up late at night?” (to see the meteors and stars)

“Now go back and read the first paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

 

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 2

Say, “Read the second paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look at you.

“Where is the setting in this paragraph? How do you know that?” (Kyle’s house)

“What does Kyle want to see on Saturday night?” (the Meteor shower)

“How does his mother react to Kyle’s request to stay up late on Saturday night?” (she says no)

“How does Kyle feel when his mother responds no to his request?” (upset)

“How would you feel right now if you were Kyle?” (answers will vary)

“What do you predict is going to happen next in this story?” (answers will vary)

“Now go back and read the second paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

 

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 3

Say, “Read the third paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look up at you.

“What time is the meteor shower going to be?” (at 2:30am)

“What do you think a meteor shower will look like?” (answers will vary)

“Who does Kyle have lunch with?” (his best friend Harvey)

“Where is the setting in this paragraph?” (school)

“What plan do the boys come up with?” (a sleepover)

“What do Kyle’s actions/choices tell you about him?” (answers will vary)

“What do you predict is going to happen next?” (answers will vary)

“Now go back and read the third paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

 

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 4

Say, “Read the fourth paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look up at you.

“How does the main character feel?” (excited)

“Why does the main character feel this way?” (excited to see watch the meteor shower )

“What do you predict is going to happen next?” (answers will vary)

“Why do you predict that?” (answers will vary)

“Now go back and read the fourth paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 5

Say, “Read the fifth paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look up at you.

“Where is the setting of this paragraph?” (Harvey’s backyard)

“How do the boys get ready for the meteor show?” (played video games, watched movie, ate snacks, etc.)

Write the word mood on the whiteboard.

“The mood in a story is the feeling that you get while reading a story. This could be happiness, sadness, darkness, anger, excitement. In this story, what would you say is the mood?” (anxiety, excitement, anticipation)

“Now go back and read the fifth paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

Put a Reading Marker at the end of Paragraph 6

Say, “Read the sixth paragraph quietly in your head and look at me when you are finished and I will ask you questions.” Wait for student to look up at you.

“What did you figure out that the author didn’t put in words?” (answers will vary)

“Why do you think Kyle woke up to aliens?” (answers will vary)

“When the alien said, “Welcome home, your highness, what did he mean?”  (answers will vary)

“What was the conflict in this story?” (Kyle wanted to see the meteor shower but his parents wouldn’t let him)

“What was the resolution?” (he saw much more than just the meteor)

“Now go back and read the sixth paragraph aloud.” Help student with any unknown words.

“Now go back and read the entire story aloud using expression when you read.” Wait for the student to read the entire story aloud.

Step 7

Evaluation

On the whiteboard write the words: First, Then, Next, Last

Say, “Tell me the entire sequence of the story we just read from start to finish. Use the transition words first, then, next and last when you tell me the sequence.” Give the student time to tell you the entire sequence of the story verbally. You can help prompt the student along.

When the student has finished, ask the following questions:

1. “Tell what this story is about?”

2. “Could this story be true? Why or why not?”

3. “Explain the title of the story?”

4. “What do you think the author’s purpose of this story was?”

5. “What is something you liked about this story?”

6. “Explain what part of the story was the most exciting to read and why?”

7. “Rate the story on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being the highest. Defend your rating.”

Step 8

Illustration

Student Workbook Page 136

Say, “Draw a picture, or pictures, that illustrates what this story is about, so that someone who did not read this story would be able to understand its main idea just by looking at your picture.”

Step 9

Summary

Student Workbook Page 137

Say, “You are now going to write a summary of this story. Use your sequencing, predicting, visualizing and inferencing strategies to write your summary. Write what happened at the beginning of the story, what happened in the middle of the story and what happened at the end of the story. Include at least one prediction, visualization and inference in your summary. Use transition words to help you organize your summary.”

Wait for the student to write the summary. When complete, have the student read the story aloud. Teachers, please use your discretion if editing. The point of this exercise is to practice the concept and get the ideas down on paper.